may-june 2015

Welcome to the EBU Newsletter.

The EBU Newsletter is published every two months in English, French,
German and Spanish. It is produced and translated thanks to the
financial support of the European Commission DG Employment, Social
Affairs and Equal Opportunities. We hope you enjoy reading it, and we
welcome your comments and feedback.

Welcome to the EBU Newsletter

The EBU Newsletter is published every two months in English, French, German and Spanish. It is produced and translated thanks to the financial support of the European Commission DG Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities. We hope you enjoy reading it, and we welcome your comments and feedback.

Snapshot

EU PROJECT UPDATE

Although 2014 marked the end of the EU-funded BASIC, eVADERandVISAL projects which EBU either coordinated or contributed to, in 2015 the organisation embarked on new European adventures… Romain Ferretti, EBU Project Officer, is of course available to provide any additional information atebu@euroblind.org.

EBU development fund contributes to the combat of Ebola in Liberia

In the summer of 2014 the news about the outbreak of a pandemic in three West African countries reached us all and the terrifying stories about how people in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia were struck with immediate death as a consequence gave rise to massive assistance and support from many parts of the world.

However, as is always the case, vulnerable groups such as the blind and partially sighted are left out and forgotten. They get no information, hardly any treatment and are not assisted if evacuation is required. The concerns that disaster reduction measures should also become disability sensitive becomes apparent in such crises as the Ebola outbreak.

National news

Spain - ONCE presents its latest developments to facilitate access to reading material for its members on Book Day

The last step taken by ONCE to bring its members
closer to reading is the GOLD (ONCE Processor of Digital Books) application for
mobile devices, both for Apple IOS and Android operating systems, which allows
to unload and reproduce Daisy format books from the digital library with one's
own telephone and which has just been launched with a spectacular takeoff in
demand.

United Kingdom - “What jobs do blind and partially sighted people do?”

A
recent report published by RNIB (EBU member for the UK) attempts to answer the
above question by presenting an extensive range of jobs performed by people
with sight loss. By adding to the existing evidence base, and consolidating
what we already know, the report illustrates how blind and partially sighted
people succeed in a wide variety of jobs in almost all employment sectors.

Albania - Access to Justice for People with Disabilities

The Project Access to
Justice for People with Disabilities
, implemented by the Albanian Blind
Association with the support of the European Commission, has been running for
almost one and a half years and has had very positive and fruitful
results.

Denmark - Severely visually impaired children and youth – a grim picture of the Danish situation

One
big issue and great concern amongst many blind and severely partially sighted
persons in Denmark is the worrying situation facing us with respect to educational
matters and the opportunity to get a job.

Announcements

Feeling Van Gogh makes art accessible for visually impaired visitors

Vincent van Gogh's
artworks can now also be ‘seen' through touch: the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam
has launched a special programme for blind and partially sighted visitors. Feeling Van Gogh consists of an interactive guided tour and a multi-sensory
workshop. Feeling Van Gogh makes Vincent van Gogh's paintings accessible for visually impaired
visitors, as well as their sighted friends, family and guides.

“Who put that there!”

In February 2015 we at RNIB (UK) launched our “Who put that there!” report which talks about the challenges blind and partially sighted people can face when out and about. In our survey, a third of people said they had been injured during a three month period when walking around their local area.

Sir Duncan Watson

Sir Duncan Watson, Chairman of RNIB (1975-90)
and President of WBU (1988-92), died shortly before his 89th birthday on 21
April.

Feature

LIVING WITH NON-24-HOUR SLEEP-WAKE DISORDER.

Non-24-Hour
Sleep-Wake Disorder “Non-24” is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by an
individual's internal body clock not being aligned with the 24-hour day. The main
symptoms of Non-24 are difficulty with sleep – difficulty falling asleep,
staying asleep, waking up in the morning, or staying awake during the day. Non-24
is a disorder most common in people who are blind. In fact, several studies
suggest that the majority of people who are totally blind and with no light
perception may have Non-24, and the sleep disruptions that go with it. An estimated 130,000 people in the European Union live with
Non-24.